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New Face Award

LUPIN the Third :The Woman Called Fujiko Mine

MONKEY Punch / YAMAMOTO Sayo

Animated TV series [Japan]

LUPIN the Third sneaks onto a desert island to steal a valuable treasure. There he meets the beautiful MINE Fujiko, a stylish thief shrouded in mystery. This chance encounter between two thieves kicks off the story. In short order Fujiko is faced with four annoying and quirky figures: LUPIN, given to sudden appearances and disappearances; JIGEN Daisuke, a gunman known for his 0.3-second draw; ISHIKAWA Goemon, who lives and kills by the sword; and Inspector ZENIGATA, whose goal is to arrest LUPIN. As we follow these five characters the plot takes unpredictable twists and turns, personalities clash, and sparks fly. Created in homage to the original manga by a new generation of animators, this first LUPIN series in 27 years is also the first by a female director.
(20 min. 15 sec. (1st episode) 20 min. (2nd episode-12th episode))

Original comic books created by Monkey Punch
© Monkey Punch All rights reserved ©TMS All rights reserved

Profile

MONKEY Punch

Japan

Born in 1937 in Hokkaido, he made his debut as a manga artist in the rental comic Zero. In 1967, he began the Lupin the Third series in the inaugural issue of Shukan Manga Action (Futabasha). Lupin, which enjoyed great popularity for its American touches, was subsequently turned into a TV series and a number of movies, and continues to attract a multitude of fans spanning several generations.

( 2012 )

YAMAMOTO Sayo

Japan

Born in 1977 in Tokyo, YAMAMOTO is best known for the animated TV series Michiko & Hatchin, which marked her debut as a director in 2008. She was also in charge of the storyboarding and staging for Samurai Champloo (directed by WATANABE Shinichiro), and assisted in the storyboarding and original backgrounds for the full-length theatrical film REDLINE (directed by KOIKE Takeshi).

( 2012 )

Award Reason

I believe that the director deserves special recognition for her ability to create an innovative narrative and pictorial structure for a story that has repeatedly been made into animated works and is by now a standard in the field, while also managing to avoid clinging to memories of the earlier films. Moreover, compared to the many series that adhere slavishly to depictions of the “everyday,” her use of the female character’s perspective conveys her unyielding intention to tell a story, and distinguishes the work from other series released over the past year in terms of both quality and the highly accomplished staging. I am looking forward to seeing more of the director’s work in the future.

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